Oven Repair

Oven Repair

Oven repair

An oven is one of the essential appliances in your kitchen, which makes your culinary life easier. It helps you to bake pies, roast meat, fish or vegetables for all your family. Food cooked in the oven is healthier than fried one, as less amount of oil is used to prepare your dishes. Unfortunately, like with any appliance, which is often used, things can go wrong over time. Worn out parts need to be fixed or replaced. Having a broken oven might be a frustrating experience.  Do not miss the opportunity to cook your favorite dishes! Call Denver Appliance Repair at (303) 200-9921 to schedule a service appointment and we will get your appliance working properly at the soonest possible time.

Here are some of the most common oven problems that our technicians often get to deal with:

  • Electric/gas oven broiler is not working
  • Electric/gas oven won’t heat
  • Electric/gas oven won’t self-clean
  • Electric/gas oven temperature is incorrect
  • Electric/gas oven won’t bake evenly
  • Electric/gas oven won’t turn on

Oven won’t heat

If your electric oven is not heating, here are the most probable causes:

  • Malfunctioning bake/broiler element

When you select the bake or broil function, the oven control allows voltage to travel to the bake or broil element, closing the circuit and causing the element to heat. If the element fails to glow red, then it is likely that the component has burned out. You can often determine that an element is burned out by checking for any visible breaks or blistering. You can also use a multimeter to test the element for continuity a continuous electrical path present in the part.  If the element tests negative for continuity, it will need to be replaced.

  • Incoming power problem

To fully operate most electric ranges require 240 volts of alternating current running through two legs of voltage each carrying 120 volts. If one leg of voltage is shut off by a tripped breaker or blown fuse, the oven may not be able to heat. If you suspect the electrical outlet is not providing sufficient voltage, you can test the outlet using a voltage meter, set two volts ac. be aware that readings can vary between 210 and 240 volts.

  • Loose or burnt wire connection

A loose or burnt wire connection could also be responsible for the oven not heating. The bake or broil power supply wires will commonly burn out near the heat source and will appear visibly damaged.

  • Blown thermal fuse

On some models, a thermal fuse will blow if the oven gets too hot shutting off power to the oven. As with the elements, you can use a multi-meter to test the thermal fuse for continuity to determine if it needs to be replaced with the new one.

  • Defective thermostat/sensor

Depending on your model, the oven control may be switched based on a thermostat in sensing bulb assembly, or an electronic control board that works with an oven sensor. The thermostat or sensor monitors the oven temperature. When the selected temperature is reached, the oven control shuts off the voltage to the element. This cycle repeats throughout the cooking process to maintain the proper temperature. If the thermostat or sensor is defective, the oven may not heat at all. You can use a multi-meter to measure the sensors resistance at room temperature. The meter should display approximately 1,100 ohms of resistance. If not, the sensor should be replaced.

  • Malfunctioning oven control board

If the sensor shows accurate resistance when tested, the oven control board itself could be malfunctioning. While the board cannot be easily tested, you can inspect it for signs of burning or a shorted out component.

If your gas oven is not heating, here are the most probable causes:

  • Faulty igniter or spark electrode

When you select the bake or broil function on your gas range, the control sends current to the appropriate igniter or spark electrode. The igniter will first draw current, or amps through the oven safety valve to open it, then it will get hot enough to ignite the gas in the oven burner. Over time, the igniter can weaken and fail to open the safety valve correctly, resulting in the oven not heating. You should remove any covers or shields and observe whether or not the burners igniter is glowing. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner has not been lit after 90 seconds, there is a high probability that the igniter has weakened and is unable to draw the proper amps to open the safety valve and light the burner. If the igniter is not glowing, you can use a multi-meter to test the part for continuity a continuous electrical path present in the igniter. If the igniter tests negative for continuity, then the part has failed completely. a weakened or failed igniter will need to be replaced with a new one. Some range ovens will have an electrode that uses a spark to ignite the gas in the burner tube similar to a spark plug. Any cracks in the porcelain housing or damage to the electrode tip could indicate that the component has failed.

  • Defective thermostat

On some models, a thermostat is used to monitor the oven temperature, and will shut off the voltage to the igniter when the desired temperature is reached. If the thermostat is defective, the igniter may not receive any voltage at all. As with the igniter, you can use a multi-meter to help determine if the thermostat has continuity or not.

  • Loose or burnt wire connection

An igniter or electrode power supply wire will commonly burn out near the heat source and will appear visibly damaged. If this happens, the igniter or electrode will be unable to ignite the gas to heat the oven.

  • Defective safety valve

The oven safety valve can fail as well. Inside the valve is a bi-metal arm that reacts to the heat generated by the amps. Once sufficient amps pass through the valve, the arm flexes and opens releasing gas into the oven burner tube. If the arm fails to open, the gas won’t ignite. Again, you can use a multi-meter to test the valve for continuity, which will determine if the valve has failed electrically.

  • Malfunctioning oven control or relay board

Some ranges will use an oven control or relay board to control the electrical current being sent to the bacon Broyles circuits. If you’ve ruled out the failure of other components, then it’s possible that the controller relay board is malfunctioning. While the board cannot be easily tested, you can inspect it for signs of burning or a shorted out component.

Oven won’t bake evenly

If your electric oven is not baking evenly, here are the most probable causes:

  • Malfunctioning bake element

When you select the bake function, the oven control allows voltage to travel to the bake element, closing the circuit and causing the element to heat. A malfunctioning element could result in uneven baking. You can often determine

that an element is defective by checking for visible breaks or blistering. You can also use a multimeter to test the element for continuity a continuous electrical path present in the part. If the element tests negative for continuity, it will need to be replaced.

  • Faulty temperature sensor

Models that have an electronic control board will use a sensor to monitor the oven temperature. When the selected temperature is reached, the oven control shuts off voltage to the element. This cycle repeats throughout the cooking process to maintain the proper temperature. If the sensor is faulty, the voltage to the element may be shut off too early or not at all. You can use a multi-meter to measure the sensor’s resistance at room temperature. The meter should display approximately 1,100 Ohms of resistance. If not, the sensor should be replaced.

  • Malfunctioning oven control board

If the sensor shows accurate resistance when tested, the oven control board itself could be malfunctioning. While the board cannot be easily tested, you can inspect it for signs of burning or a shorted out component.

  • Defective temperature control thermostat

The oven control on some models is switch based with a thermostat and sensing bulb assembly. Similar to a control board and sensor, the thermostat monitors the oven temperature and will shut off voltage to the element when the selected temperature is reached. If the oven temperature is off by more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit once preheated, it is likely that the thermostat is defective, or has lost its calibration,, making it unable to assess the oven temperature and regulate the voltage accurately. If you are unable to recalibrate the thermostat, then the entire thermostat control and sensing bulb assembly will need to be replaced.

  • Damaged convection fan motor

In a convection oven, a motor drives a fan to circulate air inside the oven cavity to maintain a consistent temperature. If the fan motor is damaged, the oven won’t bake evenly. If the fan blade is difficult to turn by hand, it is likely that the motor bearings are worn out. You can also use a multimeter to test the motor for continuity to determine if the part has failed electrically.

If your gas oven is not baking evenly, here are the most probable causes:

  • Faulty igniter or spark electrode

When you select the bake function, the control sends current to the appropriate igniter or spark electrode. The igniter will first draw current or amps through the oven safety valve to open it, then it will get hot enough to ignite the gas in the oven burner. Over time, the igniter can weaken taking longer than normal to open the safety valve. As a result, the oven temperature will drop to low before the burner reignites. You should remove any covers or shields and observe whether or not the burners igniter is glowing. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner has not been lit after 90 seconds, there is a high probability that the igniter has weakened and is unable to draw the proper amps to open the safety valve and light the burner. This problem can occur anytime during the baking process. If the igniter is not glowing, you can use a multi-meter to test the part for continuity a continuous electrical path present in the igniter. If the igniter is failing electrically, the part may alternately test positive and negative for continuity. A weakened or failing igniter will need to be replaced with a new one. Some range ovens will have an electrode that uses a spark to ignite the gas in the burner tube similar to a spark plug. Any cracks in the porcelain housing or damage to the electrode tip could indicate that the component has failed.

  • Defective thermostat

On some models, a thermostat is used to monitor the oven temperature and will shut off the voltage to the igniter when the desired temperature is reached. If the oven temperature is off by more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit once preheated, it is likely that the thermostat is defective or has lost its calibration, making it unable to assess the oven temperature and regulate the voltage accurately. If you are unable to recalibrate the thermostat, then the entire thermostat control and sensing bulb assembly will need to be replaced.

  • Defective temperature sensor

On ranges that use an electronic control board and sensor, the control will regulate the oven temperature by monitoring its resistance to the electrical current, as the oven temperature varies. If the temperature sensor is defective, the resistance reported to the board could be inaccurate, resulting in the oven not baking evenly. You can use a multimeter to measure the sensor’s resistance at room temperature. The meter should display approximately 1,100 Ohms of resistance. If not, the sensor should be replaced.

  • Malfunctioning oven control board

If the ranges oven control board is malfunctioning, it may not read the sensor resistance accurately. If the sensor has tested correctly for 1,100 Ohms of resistance, then the board itself may be at fault. While the board cannot be easily tested, you can inspect it for signs of burning or shorted out component.

Whether your oven won’t turn on, bake evenly, or the door won’t fully shut, Denver Appliance Repair can help. Give us a call (303) 200-9921 to get started with your appointment. Our technicians are highly trained and licensed. We guarantee they can fix all kinds of problems with your oven.

Call today (303) 200-9921